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  • Writer's pictureStephen

I have a client I work with who referenced an idea with me recently called GETMO or Good Enough To Move On.  They said they learned it from a leader named Craig Groeschel and some of their leadership material.  I don't know if Craig is the first person to think of this idea, but it certainly is a great idea to consider.


GETMO is the solution to a problem I sometimes talk about when I am working with leaders that I call "paralysis by analysis" or "the paralysis of perfection." Here's how I observe this functioning.  An individual or a team is working on a project or a problem and they have the solution or answer clearly in mind and are diligently working toward completion or implementation. But sometimes there can be a moment where, "It's close, but not quite there!" There is a perfect solution that we see, or are trying to find, and we just don't have it at 100% yet.  So we keep analyzing and working to get to that place of it being exactly right.


While trying to implement the best solutions to problems isn't bad, I've seen people get so stuck in the last 5-15% of trying to get to perfection that they actually don't end up doing anything. They spin out trying to find the place of perfection. And this is where GETMO can be really helpful because getting to the place of perfection may not actually be possible! Instead, if we make a decision that recognizes we've gotten far enough to move forward, that is way better than getting stuck in analysis!


Here's another way to think about this.  I am an iPhone user. I think we are currently on version 15 of the iPhone (or something like that). I am sure that when they came out with the very first one, they knew there were a whole lot more features they could include. And, as fast as technology moves, if they had kept developing and working to get to perfection, we still probably wouldn't have version #1.  But at some point the team at Apple decided, "It's GETMO!" It's good enough to put it out into the world while we still keep working on developing and making it better, which is why I am now using an iPhone 15!


There are certainly lots of places in our lives where we might apply this idea of GETMO, but where does it resonate the most with you? Is there an area in which you are caught in the loop of paralysis by analysis? Are you working to achieve some type of perfection that may not actually be possible, and what would it mean if you just decided to GETMO?


Whatever you may be working on this week, take some time to consider if GETMO would be a helpful approach!


Be Well,

Stephen


Center was created to support individuals and teams so they can live from their Purposeful Center.  We specialize in professional coaching and leadership development and we’d love to support you!  Click on our Services page to book a free consultation.

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  • Writer's pictureStephen

I've recently been reminded of a pattern that exists in our world and lives, namely that the Universal is lived out in the Particulars, and the Particulars helps to reveal the Universal.


Here's an example.  It's Spring so that means it's planting season, and we've been busy putting in flowers, vegetables, a few bushes, etc.  In our household, I am the hardscape guy. Someone else decides what to plant and where to plant it, then I help dig the holes, run the water, set the sprinklers, etc. The Universal reality is, in Redding, all plants need regular water. However, it's not enough for me to just spray a hose around every once in a while.  I have 6 Particular water lines that run in my backyard, and I have to make sure with many of our plants that each Particular plant actually has its own water. The Universal reality is, plants need water to grow, which means I have to consider how much to water each Particular plant.  


But what is so beautiful to watch over time (thanks to the smart people who decide what goes where!), is that as each Particular plant grows, they create a beautiful garden, full of sections and zones, and eventually, fruits and vegetables.  Each of the Particular plants helps to form the Universal garden we get to sit and enjoy as we sip our iced tea in the backyard!


Now if we take this idea and apply it to people and relationships (family, friends, coworkers, teams, etc.), we may have a Universal desire to treat people with kindness and respect. But, that Universal desire actually gets lived out in the Particular relationships of my life.  If I want to be Universally kind, that has to find its way into my showing kindness to this Particular person who is standing in front of me.  And of course, how I treat Particular individuals, viewed collectively, can reveal Universal patterns about how I am acting in general.  Often, if I am willing to lean in with curiosity, by examining these patterns of how I treat Particulars, I may be able to discover Universal patterns that contain bias or even prejudice that I want to address and change. And of course, those changes will have to be lived out in the Particular relationships I have with people I interact with on a personal level.


How might looking at these patterns be helpful to you?  What kind of Universal qualities or values do you want to be hallmarks of your life?  What does it look like to live out those patterns in the Particular relationships of your life? If you took some time to honestly reflect on the Particular interactions from your life in the last few weeks, what might those Particulars reveal about some Universal patterns you need to examine and change?  How could you adjust your interactions with Particular people in order to better reflect the Universal values you want to hold and live by?


Here's to allowing the Universal/Particular Dance to be lived out well in our lives this week!


Be Well,

Stephen


Center was created to support individuals and teams so they can live from their Purposeful Center.  We specialize in professional coaching and leadership development and we’d love to support you!  Click on our Services page to book a free consultation.

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  • Writer's pictureStephen

Let's start this week with some true confessions.  I am a personality type that likes to avoid conflict at all costs.  Over the years I have learned that sometimes conflict is an important (and even necessary!) element in being an effective leader/partner/parent, etc.  In fact, I have developed a whole course for leaders to help them use conflict in a way that is productive, rather than always allowing it to be destructive in our teams (reach out if you're interested in more info on that training - shameless plug!). But, because my default is to avoid conflict, I can often fall into the trap of taking ownership for things that aren't mine to carry.


This is where the language of Responsibility & Ownership are very helpful to me, and why I use these terms a lot with leaders I coach. It's important to take responsibility for what is actually mine to carry. This includes my words, my behaviors, my actions, etc. The problem comes when I fall into the trap of taking ownership for what should clearly be someone else's to own, like their words, their actions, or their behaviors. In other words, it's critical that I take responsibility for what's mine to own, but it isn't actually helpful for me to take ownership of someone else's responsibility.


Part of the reason I think it's important to make these distinctions is because it's easy to slip into playing the blame game in organizations and systems.  Rather than everyone starting from the place of taking ownership and responsibility for what is ours to own (and ONLY what is ours to own), we often point fingers and look for who we can name and blame as being at fault.  However, most of the time that doesn't help us move forward or grow, it just keeps us stuck in unhealthy patterns of growing toxicity. We're always looking for the next scapegoat to place the blame on, and not actually making changes or improving as we move forward.


However, if we take some time to be clear about what we each need to own and take responsibility for, and no more than that, then we can start to look for solutions that can carry us forward. Hopefully this will also allow us to make appropriate changes and adjustments that will help all of us be better individually and collectively in the future. When we can be honest and take responsibility and ownership for ourselves and the part we are playing in this situation or system, and everyone else is doing the same thing, it naturally leads us into a solution focused approach instead of a blaming space that keeps us stuck.


What are your natural tendencies - to take too much responsibility and ownership for what isn't actually yours, or to play the blame game and figure out who is at fault? If you decided to only take on responsibility and ownership for what was yours to carry, how might that impact the team or situation you are trying to navigate? How might ending the blame game and just being clear about who owns what, help move us toward greater solutions?


Here's to taking Ownership & Responsibility for ONLY what is ours to carry this week!


Be Well,

Stephen


Center was created to support individuals and teams so they can live from their Purposeful Center.  We specialize in professional coaching and leadership development and we’d love to support you!  Click on our Services page to book a free consultation.

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